Has Simon been hanging out with his British friends?

Has Simon been hanging out with his British friends?

Simon Cowell’s usually pretty good at using words on American Idol that are, well, American.  :) 

Or at least, they are words that you can understand without having grown up on bangers and mash. 😉

On Tuesday night’s performance show, though, he used three great Britishisms.

Fortunately, I haven’t read all that 19th Century English literature for nothing. 😉

Here, then, are your translations of Simon’s idioms from last night:

“Full stop”

Simon told Andrew Garcia that his highlight performance from weeks ago was just a cute version of a Paula Abdul song…full stop.

A “full stop” is a period, as in the punctuation. 

The implication is that there is no point in discussing it any further…the conversation is over.

American translation: “…just a cute version of a Paula song, period.”

“Interval”

Simon also told Didi Benami that her performance was like a musical, “…the bad part just before the interval.”  Americans would call that break in the show the “intermission”.   I don’t know that the pre-intermission song is typically bad, but it can be a bit cheesy.

American translation: “…the bad part just before the intermission.”

“Chalk and cheese”

Speaking of cheese…Simon told Katie Stevens that the way she was dressed was “…as compared to the past pageant horror outfits is chalk and cheese.”

Obviously, chalk and cheese are two very different things, and this particular expression goes back hundreds of years.  There is a suggestion that the two things might seem similar, but are obviously not.

Americans might say “apples and oranges”. 

American translation: “The way you look tonight as compared to the past pageant horror outfits is like apples and oranges.”

There…now you don’t have to read Oscar Wilde to understand next week’s American Idol…but you’d probably enjoy it. 😉

This post by Bufo Calvin originally appeared in the I Love My Kindle blog.

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